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Neurosky Euonia

NeuroSky EEG Used to Create Art: Science Fiction or Stunning Technology?

NeuroSky EEG Used to Create Art: Science Fiction or Stunning Technology?

The NeuroSky EEG is a headset designed to turn brainwaves into data, but until now, no one thought it might be used to create art. The artist, Lisa Park, used the headset to move water, and create art which she calls Euonia (Green for Beautiful Mind) in a stunning display of just how far technology has moved towards the futuristic sci-fi tech we once only saw in movies. The ability to move water with nothing more than your mind sounds like telekinesis, and after watching the video, most might think it’s more than just her, but in fact, Lisa is using nothing more than her mind and the Neurosky Headset.

How Does it Work?

The Neurosky EEG is a headset that is also known as the Mindwave. The device uses electroencephalography which is commonly shortened to EEG for pronunciation and spelling reasons to measure brainwaves based on the electrical impulses that run along the scalp. The Mindwave headset translates these signals into computer data which can then be used to control any number of programs or devices based on the computer programming. The company is the same company that builds the Mindwave Mobile, the Necomimi headsest, and ThinkGear AM, all revolutionary thought based headsets that can do extraordinary things that most would think are beyond our technology.

Euonia Neurosky Mindwave

The Mindwave sits on the head and monitors the scalp via a few small sensors, one on the forehead and one above the ear. Some versions of the device include headphones to cover the ears while others include a clip to help monitor the impulses sent through the ears. The headset is small, lightweight, and very cost effective as most options are below $100 in price.

Euonia Neurosky Mindwave

How She Does It

While the EEG headset obviously monitors brainwaves, most would have no idea how to translate it into the art that is Euonia.  Lisa Park recorded her brainwaves while meditating and then translated that sound into vibrations or, a more familiar term, music. Each of the bowls of water rests above a 15” speaker which then moves the water according to the vibrations of her thoughts. Because Lisa was meditating while recording, the effect is zen like and serene.

Euonia Neurosky Mindwave

Importantly, Lisa’s attempt is not the first time that EEG has been used to record music with the brain. The first attempt was actually as far back as the 60s when Alvin Luciver created Music for Solo Performer using an EEG headset, albeit his was less advanced and somewhat more expensive. His effects were also less noticeable and sound more like rattling than a work of zen. However, for a 1965 experimental music piece, this technology was very advanced for its time.

Lisa’s setup included the use of five 24” metal bowls set a top 15” speakers. Each of these bowls was arranged to represent an emotion. The headset was then connected to the computer where her brainwaves were transposed into data and then transferred into audio using Max/MSP and Reaktor software. The deep audio resulting from the conversion caused the bowls of water to vibrate in a dreamlike effect that appears almost unreal.

Euonia Neurosky Mindwave

Lisa also intends to recreate Euonia on a larger scale and then demonstrate it for the public. While she has not yet begin construction on the larger version you can check out her progress and her other work at her website LisaPark.com. You can also check out and even purchase the headset she used and attempt to create your own masterpiece using an EEG headset. Neurosky offers a great deal of apps as well as educational resources, so there are tons of things to do with the headsest.

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About Brandy

Proliferate writer, sesquipedalian, techie, Apple fangirl (don't judge),tree hugger, yogi, tea drinker, zombie hunter. Into philotherianism & philomathy. Love my job. Visit me on Google +